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Garyville Refinery in Garyville, Louisiana. (Image courtesy of Marathon Oil)

Top Eagle Ford news stories: May 27 – June 3

Review the top Eagle Ford news stories, all in one place. Headlines this past week included details on the highest-paid CEOs in each state, OPEC’s inability to show resolve, and a new way to study energy production.

5. The highest-paid CEOs by state

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Here are the top-paid CEOs by state for 2015, as calculated by The Associated Press and Equilar, an executive data firm.

The survey considered public companies with at least $1 billion in revenue that filed proxy statements with federal regulators on or before April 30, 2016. It includes CEOs who were newly hired, who often receive large grants as incentives. It does not include data for Alaska, Montana or West Virginia.

This tally includes a wider group of companies than The AP’s other lists of top-paid CEOs for 2015, which include only executives in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index who have been at their post for at least two years, among other differences in criteria.

Read more about top-paid CEOs here.

4. SLCC to offer new diploma program in oil, gas field

Image courtesy of SLCC

Image courtesy of SLCC

NEW IBERIA, La. (AP) — South Louisiana Community College will offer a new technical diploma program in oil and gas production technology, which is set to begin during the fall semester at the college’s New Iberia campus.

The 45-credit-hour program includes core instruction in oil and gas regulations; safety; pneumatic and hydraulic systems; electricity; instrumentation; oil and gas exploration drilling and production operations; wellhead completions; and plug and abandonment.

Read more about the new technical diploma program here.

3. OPEC states fail to reach deal on production

General view of a meeting of oil ministers of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting countries, OPEC, at their headquarters in Vienna, Austria, Thursday, June 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

General view of a meeting of oil ministers of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting countries, OPEC, at their headquarters in Vienna, Austria, Thursday, June 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

VIENNA (AP) — OPEC countries failed Thursday to agree on measures to influence crude supplies and prices, in a missed opportunity to show the resolve that for decades let them set how much consumers and industries worldwide would pay for gasoline, heating and related necessities.

At the same time, OPEC officials argued the cartel was alive and well, scoffing at suggestions that its authority was eroding to the point where it will soon be negligible.

“Don’t take that (to mean) that OPEC is dead,” said Secretary General Abdulla al-Badri. “OPEC will be powerful, will be strong. OPEC is alive.”

Read more about OPEC here.

2. Exxon, Chevron shareholders reject climate resolutions

Activist Penelope Bisbee walks by an ice sculpture and sign at a protest across from Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center where the Exxon Mobil annual shareholder meeting is taking place, in Dallas, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. Shareholders are scheduled to vote Wednesday on resolutions including a policy to limit global warming, put a climate expert on the board, and report on the drilling method known as hydraulic fracturing or fracking. (Jae S. Lee/The Dallas Morning News via AP)

Activist Penelope Bisbee walks by an ice sculpture and sign at a protest across from Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center where the Exxon Mobil annual shareholder meeting took place, in Dallas on Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (Jae S. Lee/The Dallas Morning News via AP)

DALLAS (AP) — Shareholders at Exxon Mobil and Chevron rejected resolutions backed by environmentalists that would have pushed the companies to take stronger stands in favor of limiting climate change.

Environmentalists took solace, however, that some of their ideas gained considerable support.

At Chevron Corp., a resolution asking for an annual report each year on how climate-change policies will affect the company received 41 percent of the vote. A similar resolution at Exxon got 38 percent.

Read more about the Exxon and Chevron shareholders here.

1. Oil prices set for fourth-straight monthly gain

Image: Carsten ten Brink via Flickr

Image: Carsten ten Brink via Flickr

The price of oil is on track to set its longest run of monthly gains in five years. Futures were up Tuesday morning in New York, paving the way for a fourth-straight monthly advance.

Oil production has been disrupted in several different countries in recent months. Nigeria’s oil production is down 50 percent after a series of militant attacks. In Canada, wildfires ravaged the oil sands city of Fort McMurray, causing residents to evacuate and slowing oil production. Workers have since resumed production after the fire eased.

Read more about oil prices here.

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