Home / Exclusives / Top Marcellus news stories – April 23-May 6
Marcellus shale gas-drilling site along PA Route 87, Lycoming County. (Image: Nicholas A. Tonelli via Flickr)

Top Marcellus news stories – April 23-May 6

Check out which news articles our readers found most engaging this past week in the list below. Enjoy!

5. Pennsylvania probes possible link between earthquakes, fracking

Pennsylvania probes possible link between earthquakes, fracking

Pennsylvania environmental regulators want to determine whether a series of minor earthquakes in the state this week were caused by nearby fracking operations by an oil and gas company.

Five tiny temblors, all too weak to be felt by humans, took place in a 22-hour span in Lawrence County, about 50 miles north of Pittsburgh and three-quarters of a mile from a natural gas well owned by Houston-based Hilcorp Energy Co. No damage was reported.

To read more about fracking related earthquakes in Pennsylvania, click here.

4. Federal regulators put brakes on Ohio energy deals

power transmission lines in fog

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Two closely watched energy deals in Ohio allowing two utility companies to impose short-term rate increases on electricity customers cannot take effect until federal regulators approve them.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said Wednesday that the power purchase agreements filed separately by Akron-based FirstEnergy and Columbus-based American Electric Power are not valid unless the two companies apply for, and receive federal approval.

To read more about FirstEnergy and American Electric Power, click here.

3. Energy explorers Halliburton and Baker Hughes abandon merger

FILE - In a Nov. 18, 2014 file photo, Halliburton Chairman, President and CEO David Lesar, third from right, rings the New York Stock Exchange opening bell. Halliburton and Baker Hughes, two companies crucial to the business of U.S. energy exploration, have abandoned their planned $34 billion merger, the Justice Department said Sunday, May 1, 2016. The department filed suit April 6 to block the merger. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

FILE – In a Nov. 18, 2014 file photo, Halliburton Chairman, President and CEO David Lesar, third from right, rings the New York Stock Exchange opening bell. Halliburton and Baker Hughes, two companies crucial to the business of U.S. energy exploration, have abandoned their planned $34 billion merger, the Justice Department said Sunday, May 1, 2016. The department filed suit April 6 to block the merger. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two companies crucial to the business of U.S. energy exploration, Halliburton and Baker Hughes, have abandoned their planned merger in the face of opposition by regulators who said it would hurt competition.

Prospects for the merger, which was valued at nearly $35 billion when it was announced in 2014, seemed especially bleak after the Justice Department sued to block the deal on April 6.

The government claimed the merger would lead to higher prices by unlawfully eliminating significant competition in markets for almost two dozen services and products crucial to finding and producing oil and natural gas in the United States.

To read more about the failed Halliburton-Baker Hughes merger, click here.

2. Energy producers weather historic oil market collapse

Energy producers weather historic oil market collapse

An oil and gas pump jack operating in the Niobrara Shale formation in Weld County, Colorado. (Image: CL Baker via Flickr)

The oil market collapse has put more pressure on energy producers than ever before, causing an unprecedented financial crisis, according to industry officials.

On average, an oil company earns only $26 for each barrel of oil sold at current oil prices, according to a report by the Houston Chronicle. In February, oil prices in the United States fell to a 13-year low of $26 per barrel. Drillers could not generate cash at those prices, but still had to pay off debts.

To read more about how producers are staying afloat, click here.

1. Natural gas explosion in Pennsylvania leaves at least 1 hurt

Natural gas explosion in Pennsylvania leaves at least 1 hurt

GREENSBURG, Pa. (AP) — Crews are responding to a natural gas explosion in Pennsylvania where at least one injury has been reported.

John Poister of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection says a well fire was reported at around 8:30 a.m. Friday in Salem Township, about 30 miles east of Pittsburgh. He says the total number of people injured and the severity of the injuries is unknown.

To read more about the natural gas explosion, click here.

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