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Top 5 Bakken stories of the week

Just in case you missed them, here are the top headlines from Bakken.com for the week of November 1st through the 7th. Have a great weekend!

5. Iraqis tour North Dakota to study gas-capturing technologies

FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2014 file photo, oil pump jacks work behind a natural gas flare near Watford City, N.D. Iraqi and U.S. Energy Department officials toured western North Dakota this week to look at technologies the state is using to curb the wasteful burning of natural gas that's a byproduct of oil production. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

FILE – In this Dec. 17, 2014 file photo, oil pump jacks work behind a natural gas flare near Watford City, N.D. Iraqi and U.S. Energy Department officials toured western North Dakota this week to look at technologies the state is using to curb the wasteful burning of natural gas that’s a byproduct of oil production. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

BISMARCK, N.D. — The Iraqi government has turned to North Dakota for help in finding solutions to the wasteful burning of natural gas that’s a byproduct of oil production.

Iraq, OPEC’s second-biggest oil producer behind Saudi Arabia, is having much the same problem dealing with excess natural gas that North Dakota has had as oil production there has increased, though the state has made strides recently to capture and use it, said Julio Friedmann, the U.S. Energy Department’s deputy assistant secretary for fossil energy.

To read the full article, click here.

4. Bakken worker death caused by toxic gas, lawsuit claims

Image: Tim Evanson via Flickr

The family of a man found dead atop an oil collection tank in the North Dakota oil patch in 2013 is suing the Texas-based company the deceased was working for.

As reported by the Billings Gazette, on July 18, 2013, the body of Blaine P. Otto of Sidney, Montana, was discovered on a catwalk above the tanks where he was checking oil levels. Bradley T. Otto, Blaine’s brother, is representing the estate of the deceased and is suing Newfield Exploration Co.

To read the full article, click here.

3. Railroad workers say long shifts unsafe

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Some BNSF Railway employees are sounding the alarm about what they say are unsafe working conditions as a result of long shifts that could lead to extreme fatigue while hauling hazardous materials.

According to one BNSF employee who contacted the Pilot, the company has imposed a new method of operation that has employees working 12-hour days, sometimes six to 10 days in a row.

“Such a safety sensitive job for engineers and conductors running trains that are up to 17,000 tons, hauling hazardous materials and such,” said the employee who declined to be publicly identified.

To read the full article, click here.

2. Keep it in the ground: Bernie Sanders wants to ban new fossil fuel development

Bernie Sanders, U.S. Senator (I-Vt.), delivers an address on how to spur the American economy. (Image: Brookings Institution via Flickr)

Bernie Sanders, U.S. Senator (I-Vt.), delivers an address on how to spur the American economy. (Image: Brookings Institution via Flickr)

On Wednesday, presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders announced his support for a new bill that would ban all new fossil fuel development on United States’ federal lands while cancelling the current leases which aren’t producing, reports Mother Jones.

The bill, titled the “Keep It In The Ground Act,” would also prohibit offshore oil and gas drilling in both the Arctic and Atlantic, in addition to halting the issue of new leases for offshore drilling in the Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico.

To read the full article, click here.

1. U.S. oil refiners look abroad for crude supplies as North Dakota boom fades

Image courtesy of Whiting Petroleum

Image courtesy of Whiting Petroleum

NEW YORK – PBF Energy Inc, one of the largest independent oil refiners in the United States, spent heavily in recent years to build the rail terminals at its Delaware City complex that it needed to take delivery of large loads of crude coming from North Dakota’s Bakken oil fields.

But now it is considering eliminating those deliveries altogether, and replacing them with foreign crude imports, according to two sources familiar with the situation. It has even closed its small Oklahoma City office that was only opened in 2013 and had served as a hub for the company’s trading in North Dakota’s oil, the sources said.

To read the full article, click here.

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