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Judge to consider request to suspend federal oil, gas rules

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — New rules for hydraulic fracturing and other petroleum industry practices on federal land are headed before a judge in Wyoming.

Four states and two petroleum industry groups are suing the U.S. Interior Department, saying the rules announced in March are unnecessarily burdensome for oil and gas developers.

The rules are set to take effect Wednesday. Colorado, North Dakota, Utah, Wyoming, the Western Energy Alliance and the Independent Petroleum Association of America seek to suspend the rules pending the outcome of their lawsuit.

U.S. District Judge Scott Skavdahl has scheduled arguments for and against that request at a hearing Tuesday in Casper.

States including Wyoming claim they already have effective regulations for oil and gas drilling. The federal government and environmental groups say the rules are necessary to protect federal land.

In related news, Federal fracking rule to cost ND income, jobs.

This article was written by Mead Gruver from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

8 comments

  1. I’ll tell you one thing… That rig sure as heck is this in NODAK! Look at the background, there’s nothing that beautiful there

  2. One of the rules is to disclose the chemicals they use. I think that is pretty basic and not an unnecessary burden since someone knows and landowners should be able to know what’s being used on their land if they want

    • Natalie, the states where oil and gas activities are ongoing require chemical disclosure and most of them through fracfocus. From the fracfocus website: “The site was created to provide the public access to reported chemicals used for hydraulic fracturing within their area. To help users put this information into perspective, the site also provides objective information on hydraulic fracturing, the chemicals used, the purposes they serve and the means by which groundwater is protected.”

      http://www.fracfocus.org/welcome

    • I heard some chemical combinations weren’t being totally disclosed because they were a product under patent

    • People who are against oil and gas development have perpetuated this alleging that no one knows the contents of patented products. They do this because pumping service companies won’t give exact contents claiming that they are trade secrets. Here is the reality. All products used in hydraulic fracturing are disclosed as I mentioned above.

      So, the hazardous components of the product are disclosed, just not the amounts of the components. The exact amounts of each component is the trade secret. It is the same for all products no matter what the industry. Only the manufacturer knows the exact formulation for Coke or Tide, but their hazardous materials are listed in the MSDS.

      http://www.sfm.state.or.us/cr2k_subdb/MSDS/COKE_ZERO_BEVERAGE_BASE_PART_1.PDF

      http://www.pg.com/productsafety/msds/Tide_Pods_Ocean_Mist_MSDS_Dec_2013.pdf

    • I actually heard it from a company man but they generally aren’t chemists, lol. But from my limited knowledge of chemistry combination & ratio can be the difference between something being inert and something being toxic. I live in Williston and love what the oil and gas has done for the economy and the U.S.’s energy independence! Non total disclosure benefits only the pumping service companies and makes the industry look less transparent which is the opposite of what O & G needs for their PR-don’t you think?

  3. As always, safety at the oil companies’ convenience.

  4. All chemicals used by large service companies at least by list if you can’t read plaques…is public knowledge when asked.