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Top 5 Bakken stories of the week

Here are the top five stories from Bakken.com for the week of March 13 through March 20. Enjoy!

5. North Dakota’s job landscape shifting (for now) away from big oil

Tom Tow, a field foreman for Great Plains Gas Compression, looks at an application at a job fair in Williston, North Dakota March 11, 2015. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

Tom Tow, a field foreman for Great Plains Gas Compression, looks at an application at a job fair in Williston, North Dakota March 11, 2015. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

WILLISTON, N.D. – Halliburton Co , Schlumberger NV and other large energy companies were conspicuously absent from a major North Dakota job fair this week, a telling sign as employers in the No. 2 U.S. oil-producing state grapple with sliding crude prices .

Instead of roustabouts, the state’s oil industry wants pump technicians, gas-processing plant operators and truck drivers to help sustain existing production of 1.2 million barrels of oil per day – not to necessarily grow production.

“When a well is out, you still have to service it,” said Cindy Sanford of Job Service North Dakota, which helped organize the two-day job fair in Williston, capital of the state’s oil boom. (There are almost 13,000 active wells in the state.) To read the full article, click here.

4. North Dakota researchers studying ‘man camps’ in oil patch

Target Logistics, Williston Lodge North, North Dakota.  (Photo courtesy Target Logistics)

Target Logistics, Williston Lodge North, North Dakota. (Photo courtesy Target Logistics)

BISMARCK, N.D. — A multi-university research team is studying temporary trailer parks occupied by thousands of people across North Dakota’s oil patch.

The team has been visiting “man camps” throughout the past three years in an effort to preserve their history. The researchers have been photographing and speaking with residents at about 50 to 60 camps in the region, the Bismarck Tribune reported.

Researcher Bill Caraher said he’s interested in social interactions at man camps that are similar to those in other communities. He said he was impressed by some of the people who have worked to make their temporary living situations feel like home. To read the full article, click here.

3. Swiss company wants decision on $500M Williston project

Photo credit: Zach Koppang / Shale Plays Media

Photo credit: Zach Koppang / Shale Plays Media

WILLISTON, N.D. — An international real estate company is pressing officials in North Dakota’s Williams County make a decision on approving a proposed $500 million development on the outskirts of the oil patch hub of Williston.

Swiss-based Stropiq has asked the Williams County Commission to force its planning and zoning committee to make a recommendation on Williston Crossing. The project would include 1 million square feet of space for retail, entertainment, office, hotel and housing development.

Developers have billed it as a regional destination with a water park and other attractions that would draw people from southern Canada, eastern Montana and surrounding areas in North Dakota. The planning and zoning committee late last month voted to study the proposal amid concerns about stressing local resources such as fire protection, utilities, and sewer and water service. To read the full article, click here.

2. North Dakota rigs take a big hit from oil’s steep fall

Getty Images via NewsCred

Getty Images via NewsCred

The number of oil-drilling rigs in North Dakota has fallen to the lowest level in six years, triggering an estimated 3,000-4,000 oil field job losses that could get worse, a top state official said Thursday.

“It is becoming painful out there in the oil patch,” Lynn Helms, director of the North Dakota Department of Mineral Resources, said on a monthly conference call with reporters.

The department, which tracks and regulates the oil industry, also reported that North Dakota oil production declined to just under 1.2 million barrels per day in January, the most recent period for which data are available. To read the full article, click here.

1. Removing U.S. oil ban would create jobs beyond drilling: report

Mody Torres (L) and Josh Anderson of Select Energy Services connect hoses between a pipeline and water tanks at a Hess fracking site near Williston, North Dakota November 12, 2014. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

Mody Torres (L) and Josh Anderson of Select Energy Services connect hoses between a pipeline and water tanks at a Hess fracking site near Williston, North Dakota November 12, 2014. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

WASHINGTON – Lifting a 40-year-old U.S. ban on crude exports would create a wide range of jobs in the oil drilling supply chain and broader economy even in states that produce little or no oil, according to a report released on Tuesday.

Some 394,000 to 859,000 U.S. jobs could be created annually from 2016 to 2030 by lifting the ban, according to the IHS report, titled: “Unleashing the Supply Chain: Assessing the Economic Impact of a U.S. crude oil free trade policy.”

Only 10 percent of the jobs would be created in actual oil production, while 30 percent would come from the supply chain, and 60 percent would come from the broader economy, the report said. The supply chain jobs would be created in industries that support drilling, such as oil field trucks, construction, information technology and rail. To read the full article, click here.

2 comments

  1. Hey Al, here’s and idea.. Build a pipeline.

  2. Williston needs to concentrate on infrastructure, housing, schools, hospitals, etc. to prepare for the recovery/ next boom.

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