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COURTESY: U.S. ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION This chart shows the Marcellus Shale's daily gas production from 2007 to 2015.
COURTESY: U.S. ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION This chart shows the Marcellus Shale's daily gas production from 2007 to 2015.

Oops! Marcellus did it again

Drilling companies in Pennsylvania did it again and broke another production record.  According to data released by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), last year shale gas production increased by 30 percent.

Marcellus drillers alone produced over 2 trillion cubic feet of gas during the second half of 2014.  Throughout the entire year, drillers produced 4 trillion cubic feet, equivalent to 16 percent of what the nation uses on an annual basis.  Frank Macchiarola of the industry trade group, America’s Natural Gas Alliance commented on the natural gas supply that Pennsylvania has generated:

“Economic growth from natural gas production has translated into increased disposable income for families and more profitable businesses … Pennsylvania also is supplying the rest of the country with abundant natural gas helping to power America.”

Leading the way again, Cabot Oil and Gas’s operations in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, are the most productive wells.  The most gas producing county in Pennsylvania is Bradford, followed by Washington, Susquehanna, Lycoming and Greene counties.

Consisting of parts of Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the Marcellus Shale area is the most productive natural gas formation in the U.S., reports the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).  The EIA tracks drilling productivity monthly and releases graphs explaining the data gathered.  The following is the regional production chart released on February 9th, the next graph will be available on March 9th.

Note: *The Eagle Ford rig count has been revised downwards due to an error, which double counted rigs operating in La Salle county. This error, related to spelling variations of La Salle, had no impact on the estimated Eagle Ford production, but was suppressing the rig productivity for both oil and gas. We would like to thank James Williams of WTRG Economics, for identifying the error, which now corrected will improve the accuracy of the estimates on rig productivity.  Courtesy of the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Note: *The Eagle Ford rig count has been revised downwards due to an error, which double counted rigs operating in La Salle county. This error, related to spelling variations of La Salle, had no impact on the estimated Eagle Ford production, but was suppressing the rig productivity for both oil and gas. We would like to thank James Williams of WTRG Economics, for identifying the error, which now corrected will improve the accuracy of the estimates on rig productivity. Courtesy of the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

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